Voyager 1 fires off for the first time in 37 years

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Now, let us totally set aside the fact that, “yet again”, all we are presented are meager artist illustrations and nothing more. Let’s look a little deeper, shall we? But first, where exactly is the Voyager 1 located? And, since we have nothing else, let’s look at another drawing instead of actual proof for how far away this man made object is.

The craft is allegedly about to exit what is known as the heliosphere, thus entering true deep space out beyond our solar system. The heliosphere is the bubble-like region of space dominated by the Sun, which extends far beyond the orbit of Pluto. The outer region of this is known as the heliosheath. Apparently, the mass of our sun creates a gravitational pull that keeps the planets in place. But, for some reason has an opposite affect when it comes to thisbubble that protects our system from the bombardment of things outside of it. You know, because gravity not only pulls, it pushes too somehow… lol, what a joke.

Anyway, moving on.

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All of that is beside the point.

The real question here is this… if you leave a truck in the garage for 36 years without cranking it up, do you honestly think it is going to start on year 37 when you finally decide to climb in it and give the key a turn? Just be honest with yourself… do you really think it would?

But… the voyager has solar panels, dumb-dumb”.

You know what, you’re right. How silly of me.

Let’s do an experiment. Let’s attach solar panels to a car, leave the car in the street untouched for 37 years (oh, and the sun needs to be 11.7 billion miles farther away than normal). Then, we’ll get in the car after all that time and see if she fires off.

I have my doubts it would work.

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And one of the primary reasons I look at the idea of Voyager 1 “firing off” after all this time and laugh, isn’t the timing, the distance, or the age. No, it’s the fact that you need oxygen to create a spark.

And guess what…

That is the one thing that does not exist in the vacuum of space. No offense, but this is rubbish. You are being presented cartoons, because that is all this is. Material things decay over time. There is no physical possibility that this man made object would crank after 37 years without being active. Let alone the idea that we are to believe that humans are controlling it from more than 11.7 billion miles away via wireless signal.

I can’t even step five foot out of my home without losing the wi-fi signal on my phone. If our wireless capabilities really are that epic according to NASA, then why in the world do I even pay a data plan with my cell provider? I should be able to lock onto my home signal for miles and miles.

How delusional do you honestly have to be?

Space is fake. Just look at the cartoons you are being fed. But, don’t ask me. I am clearly the one who is ignorant.

And lastly… let us pretend for a moment that the Voyager is actually where we are told. And let us pretend that it did indeed fire off. The vacuum of space is empty. There is nothing there. With that, if Voyager did actually fire off and there is nothing there for it to push against when firing off (like an atmosphere, water, of the ground for example), then what propels it forward? It has nothing to push against to help it propel forward, remember.

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For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. If you push against nothing, nothing is going to happen.

Space is fake.

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Space illustration to the rescue!!!

Well, as usually… let’s leave it to the space artists to tell us what is actually going on above us.

Or better yet, these scientific “renderings” that clearly show a spec, which explains that massive rock art above.

Same fake nonsense. Just a different day.

Latest from the imaginations of space

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The only limit to human future is our own imaginations.” – Don Pettit

Now, I realize that I have used the above little quote from Don Pettit a few times when writing blog posts about space. But, I just find it too ironic to not come back to time and time again. Above, we have Don, in reference to space exploration, explaining that the only limitations is our imagination. He doesn’t say “willpower“, or “intelligence“, or “ambition to succeed“, or “technological achievements“. No, he chose to use the word “imagination“.

The only thing keeping us from reaching further into space is our imagination. It is our “imagination” that can take us “anywhere“!

With that said… let’s take a moment to review the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of NASA for their latest news from space.

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This is an illustration.
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All of these are also illustrations.
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All of these are also illustration in case you didn’t notice.
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Would you look at that… more artist illustrations.

Just for the sake of assuming there are some of you that may not understand where I am going with this post, I will spell it out for you. Every single article for the last two months posted under the JPL of NASA are supported by the “imaginations” of an artist illustrator. If you go take a look for yourself, you will more than likely find that only 1 in 10 articles on that website are data driver rather than imagination driven. And even then, if 9 out of 10 are fake… who is to say that the data isn’t also fake?

But hey, don’t take my word for it. I am clearly just an ignorant blogger and nothing more. Popular Science Magazine on the other hand… they might know what they’re talking about. These guys admit that the best jobs in science belong to the people that get paid to have an imagination by turning raw data into art.

That is all that space is, people… an artist’s imagination. And people like Don Pettit know this.

Space is fake.

NASA – Not Always Scientifically Accurate

Geostationaryjava3D (1)Satellite Internet access is Internet access provided through communications satellites. Modern consumer grade satellite Internet service is typically provided to individual users through geostationary satellites that can offer relatively high data speeds, with newer satellites using K-band to achieve downstream data speeds up to 50 Mbps. A geostationary orbit, geostationary Earth orbit or geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) is a circular orbit 35,786 kilometres (22,236 miles) above the Earth’s equator and following the direction of the Earth’s rotation. An object in such an orbit has an orbital period equal to the Earth’s rotational period (one sidereal day) and thus appears motionless, at a fixed position in the sky, to ground observers.

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A Van Allen radiation belt is a zone of energetic charged particles, most of which originate from the solar wind that is captured by and held around a planet by that planet’s magnetic field. The Earth has two such belts and sometimes others may be temporarily created. The discovery of the belts is credited to James Van Allen, and as a result the Earth’s belts are known as the Van Allen belts. Earth’s two main belts extend from an altitude of about 500 to 58,000 kilometers (300 to 36,000 miles) above the surface in which region radiation levels vary. Most of the particles that form the belts are thought to come from solar wind and other particles by cosmic rays. By trapping the solar wind, the magnetic field deflects those energetic particles and protects the Earth’s atmosphere from destruction.

Quote from the Above Video: “Radiation like this could harm the guidance systems, on-board computers, or other electronics on Orion“.

Now, with that in mind… here we are at the end of 2017 and the Orion capsule has still not been sent up to take its readings while also testing to see what affects the radiation will have on the electronics of the craft. With that, Syncom 2 was the first geosynchronous communications satellite. The satellite was launched by NASA on July 26, 1963 with the Delta B #20 launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral.

Here is my questionHow are we to believe that there are thirty so called geosynchronous communications satellites currently in deep orbit parked right smack dab in the middle of the Van Allen Radiation Belt, and still… in 2017 we have no readings on the affects of this radiation on guidance systems or the computers and electronic components of a man made object?

This makes absolutely no sense.

We have supposedly had man made computer based guidance system electronics in geosynchronous orbit for almost 55 years, and here we have NASA admitting they still don’t know what to expect? Those geosynchronous communications satellites have essentially been parked up there in the thick of that radiation for more than 5 decades and NASA is just now deciding to send up Orion in 2018 to take readings that we clearly should already have.

Hhmmmm…

Seems legit.

SpaceX to the rescue!!!

Yesterday SpaceX launched a Russian Cargo craft which plans to dock with the ISS within two days after launch. The Progress carried almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies for the Expedition 53 crew on the station. The spacecraft is scheduled to make a quick, two-orbit journey to the station.

Now, I’m no expert… but seriously, if anyone watches this video and still thinks it is real… wow, just wow.

But, for those of you that don’t feel the need to watch a 10 minute video of the most recent SpaceX launch, here are some quick little screen captured snippets from that video. It’s pretty much the most majestic thing I have ever seen.

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Let’s totally disregard the fact that the live footage clearly shows the rocket only reaching an altitude of about 20 miles maximum before changing its trajectory from an upward assent to a horizontal then downward one before the feed changes to that pure gold CGI.

Wow… I am literally at a loss for words here. This has got to be the most realistic thing I have ever seen (of course only if it’s 1998 and you are playing a PlayStation One, of course).

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How in the mess is anyone buying this junk? SpaceX needs to hire some of the guys that have done more recent work for things like the PS4.

I think it might be a good move… just saying.

NASA – Net Allocation Sorely Abused

When I woke up this morning and saw that this mess was on the top 3 for today’s headlines in science I just had to chime in. This is ridiculous. Then again, maybe it isn’t when you consider all the facts. Last night astronauts filmed a “trick video” using a fidget spinner on the ISS.

With that said, let’s take a look at the facts. I can’t help but wonder how much it cost to get that fidget spinner up there in the first place. Not to mention the fact that it is a “custom” fidget spinner (so, there was already some money spent there). Depending on what method was used, the cost per pound for NASA to send anything to the International Space Station is pretty ridiculous. It can cost anywhere from $2,000 per pound or as high as $13,000 per pound. Needless to say, getting cargo to the crew is expensive.

From what I could find on the web, the average “custom” fidget spinner weighs about 70 grams. So, let’s do the math.

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If you think I am making those numbers up, then here is a 2016 Business Insider article that covers some of those allocated costs for any given trip to the ISS. The cost for sending things into space is preposterous.

Setting all of this aside, let’s be generous here and give good ol’ NASA the benefit of the doubt. Let’s assume that since the fidget spinner is custom, it cost $20 while also going with the lowest possible cargo cost. Up front, this little “trick video” cost $350 right out of the gate (and again, that is being generous).

Part of me wants to get aggravated at this, but then again… we need to review all of the facts, remember?

So… with that, I can’t help but ask what the purpose of a fidget spinner might be. This Live Science article from August of 2017 hit the nail right on the head. Here is a quote from that article.

There’s no doubt that toys that allow kids to fidget can benefit kids with autism. Occupational therapists often use sensory toys like tactile discs, Koosh balls and even putties or clays to soothe kids who have sensory-processing issues. Similarly, research has shown that movement can help kids with ADHD to focus. 

Maybe the title of my post is wrong. Maybe, just maybe… it was money well spent after all. Because let’s face it, you never actually see any real science taking place on the ISS. It’s always just them doing flips, spinning their microphone, or flying. Maybe NASA sent that fidget spinner for a reason (to help these kids focus and get back on task).

But seriously though, space is fake and it doesn’t cost a dime to send anything up there. All of those cargo costs is just one way for the government to funnel massive lumps of money.

Because, at the end of it all this isn’t about 350 dollars. It is about 1.5 billion dollars per cargo shipment (which includes every time we send man as part of that cargo shipment).

But, who are we kidding… I am ignorant. Don’t listen to me.