Sun rise from more than 250 miles high

Okay, so I have an honest question. You have on record people like Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Carl Sagan, and others such as Stuart Clark… a well-known astronomer stating that you can irrefutably see the curvature of the earth by merely climbing a mountain or even taking a ride on an airplane. First off, the tallest mountain in the world doesn’t even exceed 6 miles in elevation. As for an airplane, commercial grade planes generally stick to an altitude of around 6 to 8 miles high.

So… here is the question.

If I can see the curvature of the earth at only 5 to 8 miles in altitude as suggested by the most brilliant minds of our time, then why is it that the following footage from the ISS exists?


According to science people (you know, the ones that do our thinking for us), the International Space Station maintains an altitude of more than 250 miles. I don’t know about you, but that sun rise definitely looks like it is taking place against a rather horizontal line.

And if you want to argue that the footage isn’t form the ISS, then here is where I got it from. This video was published by NASA on March 5th, just yesterday. They spend the duration of the video interviewing the ISS with some school students. And then, boom… they decided to close with a shot of the sun rise from the ISS while showing the solar panels in the bottom of the shot. The footage in question starts at roughly the 21 minute mark.

If I can’t see the curvature at 250 miles in altitude, what in the world makes people like Bill, Neil, Sagan, and Stuart so adamant about observing it at the 5 miles mark?