The ISS and the Blue Screen of DEATH

So, today the Soyuz MS-05 Docked to the International Space Station, bringing along with it three new NASA crew members. Considering the fact that NASA changes crew members on the ISS all the time, this isn’t really all that spectacular. Unless of course, you stop and consider the actual severity of it all and how it tends to play out the same way every single time. If you want to, you can watch the entire video below. But, honestly I will just hit the highlights for you.

For starters, the ISS is roughly 250 miles above the surface of the earth in an area known as the thermosphere. In this area of the atmosphere, the temperatures can rise to nearly 3,500 degrees F. This is a rather peculiar predicament when we consider the high quantity of aluminum that exists on the outer portion of the ISS (the melting point of aluminum is only 1,200 degrees F).

Not only does the ISS exist in this hot region of space below the exosphere, but it is traveling at nearly 17,150 MPH. At this speed it only takes the ISS an hour and a half to do one full revolution around the earth. That is pretty freaking fast if you ask me. To put this into perspective, that is about 5 miles a second.

That right there has me asking one simple question about G force.

How in the world is someone able to withstand a constant pull of more than 9G while moving at that speed for that long? G force is based on the radius of motion accompanied by speed. And if the astronauts on the Soyuz are reaching a speed of 17,000 MPH with a radius of 6.371 million meters (radius of the earth) during acceleration, they are experiencing a constant pull of more than 9G the entire trip to the ISS. How in the world are they reaching that speed with only a 200 mile window between them and their destination? At 5 miles a second it would have passed up the ISS by 100 miles in less than 60 seconds. And, how are they not blacking out? Someone has to stay conscious if they intend to dock without crashing headlong into the ISS at more than 5 miles a second… right? And before you tell me that there is zero G, they are in the thermosphere… not the exosphere. The thermosphere is still an atmosphere rich area. So… please explain how they aren’t blacking out. And then, when they do dock at that obnoxious of a speed how is it that they are not bumping one another completely off course out of control? One little bump or unanticipated nudge would knock the ISS off of its current orbital path by more than 5 miles a second into a new direction. One little misstep nudge could have the ISS 10 miles away in less than two seconds. How is it logically possible for a docking to even occur when you consider these things as a reality?

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With all of this type of stuff in mind I would like to take a moment to point out the NASA routine for docking onto the ISS. For starters, make sure that you get some super legit footage of the crew as they approach (clearly showing that they are traveling faster than you are in order to catch up to you while clearly not being at an altitude of 200 miles high).  Then… when they dock, make sure that you are not on the sun lit side of the earth according to protocol as usual (doing this helps make the illusion of a 17,150 MPH collision between two manned objects seem plausible). They are always on the dark side when the dock occurs leaving very little to be seen. Then, when the sun comes back around all of the work is magically done with everyone at ground control applauding the diligent efforts of everyone involved (every time).

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And of course… what NASA docking onto the ISS wouldn’t be complete without the dreaded blue screen of death. That’s right, people… that major moment when the cabins have pressurized and we are opening the hatch to bring the two crews together the camera goes blue (every single time). And whala!!! Just like you know NASA does every time, the camera comes back on just in time for that money shot of all the crew members standing in a row with their headsets on ready to talk to the public with smiling faces (because, you know… that wasn’t just a life and death situation just now). Apparently all Astronauts have nerves of iron. Their blood pressure isn’t through the ruff right now or anything…

Let’s totally forget the fact that the crew members in the Soyuz were wearing totally different outfits when they took off. Let’s totally forget that they just also spent more than two hours reach speeds of 17,000+ MPH with a radial velocity of more than 9G’s for the entire ride (the average person blacks out at 5G). But hey, no big deal… no sweat. No pale faces. No need to check vitals after going that fast in that short of a time while creating an intentional head on collision while on the verge of a blackout with a $150 billion dollar piece of equipment. We will check vitals after the interview.

Give me a break, people. There is no physical way for two opposing objects traveling at that speed to connect with such grace.

NASA is a liar. And that is all there is to it.

If you think I am making this stuff up, go find me footage of any astronauts passing through the airlock for either a spacewalk or during a docking/departure. You will not find it, because there is none. All you will ever find is the blue screen of death. And of course, today was no different.

Fake!!!

But don’t take my word for it… let’s watch this G force compilation.

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