The Cavendish Experiment compromised by the pendulum effect?

I have a new question for the “scientists of today”. This question is in relationship to the Cavendish Experiment. For those of you that don’t know anything about this experiment, it’s a really big deal for physics and how we measure the known universe both in lengths and relative mass. How big is the earth? How massive is the moon? If the two objects are said to be such and such density, then they must be thus far apart for relative rotation to occur. And so on and so on. This experiment essentially weighed the earth giving us the gravitational constant. This constant is used to measure everything we know about the known universe. So, for me as a fan of space, this is the backbone of this field of science. For those of you that don’t know how the test works, here is a video of what the test was.

The thing that I find most odd about this test is the following. No one has actually successfully replicated this experiment, at least not that I have found. If you do a test and yielded a positive result, wouldn’t you want to test and retest the result to insure that you have it correct. Or better yet, change some variables to insure that the test isn’t being compromised by some outside force? Here is a video of s science professor expressing his admiration for the experiment despite having never gotten the experiment to work, himself. I find this odd.

Now, I have done enough digging that I have come across quite a few people who have attempted this experiment to varying degrees. And at that, with a few factors that in my opinion actually compromise the results. If you will note, the first two videos suggested two things. One, a closed system; so that no wind current would alter the results. And two; that the observer couldn’t be in the same room because their mass would alter the state of the experiment. And yet, if you look you will find countless attempts in open space with the observer present, no real control on the fixed points for observation, and air conditioning being factored into the process. All the tests you will find are relatively the same, and in my eyes inconclusive.

The idea behind the test is simple. The large mass of balls will gravitationally attract the smaller mass of balls toward themselves inward, twisting the pendulum or torsion rod toward the larger masses, thus giving us the gravitational constant when factoring the arch of the changes. When it comes to all of these tests, all I see is a free spinning shaft with two balls eventually touching against a resistance point. And because they touched the experiment essentially worked.

I’m sorry, but I don’t buy it. And here’s why. How many of you have heard of a foucault pendulum? For those of you who don’t know what that is, here it is.

So, here is my issue with how the most recent Cavendish Experiments have been done. Wouldn’t it stand to reason that a freestanding object on a cord hanging down from a fixed point would be compromised by the rotation of the earth? And if that is true, as the foucault pendulum clearly shows us, then wouldn’t the Cavendish Experiment be successful every time based on the pendulum effect alone? Eventually the rotational momentum would force the rods in a direction causing the smaller masses to find themselves resting against the larger objects?

With that in mind I propose an experiment (one of which I have yet to see done). The only way to determine for sure that the pendulum effect does not in any way neutralize the test results of the Cavendish Experiment we must do the test in three distinctly different ways. One, we set it up as shown by all the other endless attempts you will find online. The result will be the same as always. The smaller masses turn and connect with the larger ones. The second test would be to raise the smaller masses up directly above the larger masses by mere meters so that they don’t actually make contact. After doing this we set the masses 90 degrees from one another or at a 15 as shown in the first video and leave it alone. Over the course of 48 hours or more one of three things will have occurred. One, the smaller masses will do nothing. Two, they will find themselves fixed above the larger masses as the Experiment would suggest (attraction working as it should). Or three, the pendulum effect will make itself known and we will see the smaller masses rotate above the larger masses with no added resistance over a very long period of time. Then, let’s assume that the attraction does occur as we would expect/hope. If that is the case, the third and final test would be to start the test over and do it this time with the larger masses removed. If the smaller masses find themselves eventually resting in the same parallel point as the previous two tests eliminating the pendulum effect as a possiblye veritable, then wouldn’t it stand to reason that there are other variables we need to be considering that may be affecting the result (ie; Northern Pole. Large objects in or around the experiment that may alter its result)?

With this in mind, I find it hard to believe we found Big G from this experiment with no real re-verification of any kind taking place. Before we can truly say that this test works we need to 100 percent insure that the pendulum effect does not play a role in any way toward altering the results of this experiment. And so far, from what I have seen, no one has done this.

Why is that?

Please note I am not one of those people with some silly hidden agenda. I am just an honest guy seeking honest answers about science and how we understand the world around us.

So, why is it important to insure that we remove the pendulum affect from this experiment? Everything you know about the size, distance, and gravitational attraction of our known solar system is resting on the results of this one test (results I might add that were given to use in the 1800’s and have yet to be precisely duplicated since).

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